-Pesticide Free Parks

HAHA! Organic herbicide sprayed in landscape beds in Kershaw Park and the City Pier was ineffective

By Mike Murphy mmurphy@messengerpostmedia.com
Posted Sep 15, 2017 at 7:26 AM
Updated Sep 15, 2017 at 7:26 AM

Parks staff are dealing with more weeds and pest damage a year into the moratorium
CANANDAIGUA — The first year of a five-year moratorium on the use of pesticides in city parks is up.
And city parks staff are having to deal with more weeds and pests, according to a memo prepared by parks staff and the Department of Public Works.
City Council is now weighing a lifting of the moratorium, which was narrowly approved last June, and instead would rely on an Integrated Pest Management program that was in use previously. A motion to repeal the moratorium was OK’d by a 3-1 vote at council’s environmental parks committee Tuesday night.
An organic herbicide sprayed in landscape beds in Kershaw Park and the City Pier was ineffective, according to Jim Sprague, director of public works for the city.
Northeast Park also is showing signs of heavy grub damage, leaving a thin and weak turf that creates safety issues for those who use the athletic fields there, according to the report.
“This has not worked very well,” Sprague said at the committee meeting.
Also, parks staff members worked more hours to control weeds than they did when the pesticide Roundup was applied, which costs three times less than the cost of the herbicide, according to Parks Maintenance Supervisor Dick Gates.
“And it doesn’t work,” Gates said.

The report stops short of recommending the moratorium’s end, but does say keeping it in place will change the way city parks look and are maintained.

Councilmember Matt Martin said the moratorium was a bad idea when it was voted on and it still is, in calling for a repeal.
“I don’t want to see us lose any of our assets or resources,” Martin said. “I don’t want to see anybody getting hurt.”
City Councilmember Anita Twitchell, a proponent of the moratorium, said other methods — different landscaping or different herbicides among them — should be tried rather than “scrap” the idea as soon “we hit bumps in the road.”
“Let’s be willing to stick with it awhile, like we promised we would,” Twitchell said.
The former pest management program, which was instituted in 2010, does call for the limited use of pesticides and notes their application, on average, is done every five years. The program was completed with the assistance of Cornell University turf management researchers and the city needs to rely on the advice of experts, said Councilmember David Whitcomb.
“I don’t believe the way we used pesticides in the past or the way staff will use in the future … is really that outside the norm or dangerous,” Whitcomb said.

 

Continue reading

Co-infection of Ticks: The Rule Rather Than the Exception

Abstract

Introduction

Ticks are the most common arthropod vectors of both human and animal diseases in Europe, and the Ixodes ricinus tick species is able to transmit a large number of bacteria, viruses and parasites. Ticks may also be co-infected with several pathogens, with a subsequent high likelihood of co-transmission to humans or animals. However few data exist regarding co-infection prevalences, and these studies only focus on certain well-known pathogens. In addition to pathogens, ticks also carry symbionts that may play important roles in tick biology, and could interfere with pathogen maintenance and transmission. In this study we evaluated the prevalence of 38 pathogens and four symbionts and their co-infection levels as well as possible interactions between pathogens, or between pathogens and symbionts.

Methodology/principal findings

A total of 267 Ixodes ricinus female specimens were collected in the French Ardennes and analyzed by high-throughput real-time PCR for the presence of 37 pathogens (bacteria and parasites), by rRT-PCR to detect the presence of Tick-Borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) and by nested PCR to detect four symbionts. Possible multipartite interactions between pathogens, or between pathogens and symbionts were statistically evaluated. Among the infected ticks, 45% were co-infected, and carried up to five different pathogens. When adding symbiont prevalences, all ticks were infected by at least one microorganism, and up to eight microorganisms were identified in the same tick. When considering possible interactions between pathogens, the results suggested a strong association between Borrelia garinii and B. afzelii, whereas there were no significant interactions between symbionts and pathogens.

Conclusion/significance

Continue reading

Fiesta Herbicide Vs 2,4-D | Montgomery County Putting FIESTA to the TEST – Bethesda Beat

Montgomery Parks to Test ‘Natural Weed-Killer’ As Pesticide Debate Set to Resume

Parks has said pesticide ban would hurt its ability to keep some playing fields in shape

The two soccer fields at Timberlawn Local Park are part of a Montgomery Parks pilot project on turfgrass treatment

The two soccer fields at Timberlawn Local Park are part of a Montgomery Parks pilot project on turfgrass treatment

VIA MONTGOMERY COUNTY

Continue reading

How Organic Municipalities Do It | Bob Ceccolini | Cheshire Connecticut

Lots of taxpayers money and a lot of summer students to help replace the fields yearly.

Town of Cheshire Minutes 2014

December 2013: 

Mr. Ceccolini reported that he, Town Manager Milone, and Dan Marsaglia (BOE) met 
with the DEEP about pesticide and organic use by municipalities. A state-wide 
program will be undertaken, and at this time, Cheshire is the only town that is almost totally organic in use. For K-8 schools, no pesticides can be used – only synthetic products are allowed. Cheshire’s Parks and Rec Department has been doing heavy organic use since 2006, and the State looks to Cheshire for assistance and information on the town’s organic program.  Here:

April 2014:

Mr. Ceccolini said the grounds are quite wet and people are doing their best to try and stay off the wet areas. The Lacrosse teams were practicing out in the parking lot yesterday. Mr. Ceccolini said all the teams were able to use the turf field and share it.

May 2014:

Continue reading

Organic Failure Documented in Connecticut | AN ACT CONCERNING PESTICIDES ON SCHOOL GROUNDS, PARKS, PLAYGROUNDS, ATHLETIC FIELDS AND MUNICIPAL GREENS AND BANNING THE SALE AND USE OF GENETICALLY-ENGINEERED LAWN OR TURF SEEDS.

Gideon Forman Is Wrong,

Chip Osborne Is Wrong,

Connecticut Association of Public School Superintendents:  School officials have used more expensive and labor-intensive organic treatments, which have proven ineffective. Many fields have been extensively damaged or are even unplayable, compromising student safety. Additionally the ban has led to problems with pests, diseases and invasives like poison ivy.

 

Continue reading