Author: admin

Once again, IARC scientists withheld critical data from studies that concluded glyphosate does not pose a cancer threat.

“By denying scientific principles, one may maintain any paradox.” – Galileo Galilei

More Evidence Swept Under the IARC Rug

For the second time in over two months, evidence has surfaced that further demonstrates the International Agency for Research on Cancer’s (IARC) lack of transparency, conflicts of interest, and hidden agenda.

On August 17, Politico revealed that Charles Williams Jameson, a member of IARC’s working group on glyphosate (Monograph 112 program) and retired National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) scientist, testified under oath that he “did not possess the full picture” on glyphosate prior to the group’s March 2015 conclusion that the herbicide is “probably carcinogenic to humans.”  Once again, IARC scientists withheld critical data from studies that concluded glyphosate does not pose a cancer threat.

 

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HAHA! Organic herbicide sprayed in landscape beds in Kershaw Park and the City Pier was ineffective

By Mike Murphy mmurphy@messengerpostmedia.com
Posted Sep 15, 2017 at 7:26 AM
Updated Sep 15, 2017 at 7:26 AM

Parks staff are dealing with more weeds and pest damage a year into the moratorium
CANANDAIGUA — The first year of a five-year moratorium on the use of pesticides in city parks is up.
And city parks staff are having to deal with more weeds and pests, according to a memo prepared by parks staff and the Department of Public Works.
City Council is now weighing a lifting of the moratorium, which was narrowly approved last June, and instead would rely on an Integrated Pest Management program that was in use previously. A motion to repeal the moratorium was OK’d by a 3-1 vote at council’s environmental parks committee Tuesday night.
An organic herbicide sprayed in landscape beds in Kershaw Park and the City Pier was ineffective, according to Jim Sprague, director of public works for the city.
Northeast Park also is showing signs of heavy grub damage, leaving a thin and weak turf that creates safety issues for those who use the athletic fields there, according to the report.
“This has not worked very well,” Sprague said at the committee meeting.
Also, parks staff members worked more hours to control weeds than they did when the pesticide Roundup was applied, which costs three times less than the cost of the herbicide, according to Parks Maintenance Supervisor Dick Gates.
“And it doesn’t work,” Gates said.

The report stops short of recommending the moratorium’s end, but does say keeping it in place will change the way city parks look and are maintained.

Councilmember Matt Martin said the moratorium was a bad idea when it was voted on and it still is, in calling for a repeal.
“I don’t want to see us lose any of our assets or resources,” Martin said. “I don’t want to see anybody getting hurt.”
City Councilmember Anita Twitchell, a proponent of the moratorium, said other methods — different landscaping or different herbicides among them — should be tried rather than “scrap” the idea as soon “we hit bumps in the road.”
“Let’s be willing to stick with it awhile, like we promised we would,” Twitchell said.
The former pest management program, which was instituted in 2010, does call for the limited use of pesticides and notes their application, on average, is done every five years. The program was completed with the assistance of Cornell University turf management researchers and the city needs to rely on the advice of experts, said Councilmember David Whitcomb.
“I don’t believe the way we used pesticides in the past or the way staff will use in the future … is really that outside the norm or dangerous,” Whitcomb said.

 

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Peer review of the pesticide risk assessment of the potential endocrine disrupting properties of glyphosate

 

  • European Food Safety Authority (EFSA)

 

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Beveridge & Diamond Wins Preemption Case Regarding Local Pesticides Ban

Author: Anthony L. Michaels
August 3, 2017

Litigators in Beveridge & Diamond’s Washington, DC Office on August 3 secured an important preemption ruling from the Circuit Court of Montgomery County, Maryland.  Complete Lawn Care, Inc., et. al., v. Montgomery County, Civil Action No. 427200-V.  The court invalidated a County ordinance banning pesticide use on private lawns as preempted by State law.  This adds to a growing body of cases finding that localities in various states lack the authority to impose their own local pesticide requirements that effectively “veto” the comprehensive review and approval processes already in place for these products at the state and federal levels.  The decision is of particular importance due to the size of Montgomery County, which drew significant attention with its ordinance.

Among other holdings, Judge Terrence McGann found that “[t]he State of Maryland has already established comprehensive pesticide use regulations . . . [that] regulate every facet of pesticide use in the State of Maryland.”  Because “Maryland law dictates precisely where, when, and how each and every pesticide it has authorized may be used,” Judge McGann concluded that “no room is left for more regulation.”  The court also held that the ordinance conflicts with State law and would “frustrat[e] the explicit State law goal of promoting uniformity in pesticide regulatory requirements.”  In holding it unlawful, the court concluded that the ordinance “flouts decades of State primacy in ensuring safe and proper pesticide use, undermines the State’s system of comprehensive and uniform product approval and regulation, and prohibits products and conduct that have been affirmatively approved and licensed by the State.”

Principal Tony Michaels argued the case for a group of successful Plaintiffs:  seven local residents, six small businesses, and Responsible Industry for a Sound Environment (RISE), the national trade association representing manufacturers, formulators, distributors and other industry leaders engaged with specialty pesticides and fertilizers used by consumers and professionals.  With Tony on the briefing at Beveridge & Diamond were Kathy Szmuszkovicz, Gus Bauman, James Slaughter, and Kaitlyn Shannon.  The same decision also addresses a companion case brought by another group of Plaintiffs, represented by Tim Maloney and Alyse Prawde of Joseph, Greenwald & Laake, and Catherine Carroll and Arpit Garg of Wilmer Hale.  The Defendant Montgomery County was represented by Ed Lattner and Walter Wilson of the County Attorney’s office.

Numerous media outlets have covered the decision, including the Washington PostBethesda Magazine, WTOP, and the Daily Record (subscription required).

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Judge Strikes Down Montgomery County’s Pesticide Ban

Published:

Via Wikimedia Commons

Montgomery County Circuit Court Judge Terrence McGann on Thursday struck down the county’s general pesticide ban in a ruling that opponents of the ban called precedent setting.

McGann ruled that state law preempts the law that the County Council passed in 2015. Continue reading