U.S.A.

Once again, IARC scientists withheld critical data from studies that concluded glyphosate does not pose a cancer threat.

“By denying scientific principles, one may maintain any paradox.” – Galileo Galilei

More Evidence Swept Under the IARC Rug

For the second time in over two months, evidence has surfaced that further demonstrates the International Agency for Research on Cancer’s (IARC) lack of transparency, conflicts of interest, and hidden agenda.

On August 17, Politico revealed that Charles Williams Jameson, a member of IARC’s working group on glyphosate (Monograph 112 program) and retired National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) scientist, testified under oath that he “did not possess the full picture” on glyphosate prior to the group’s March 2015 conclusion that the herbicide is “probably carcinogenic to humans.”  Once again, IARC scientists withheld critical data from studies that concluded glyphosate does not pose a cancer threat.

 

Continue reading

Judge Strikes Down Montgomery County’s Pesticide Ban

Published:

Via Wikimedia Commons

Montgomery County Circuit Court Judge Terrence McGann on Thursday struck down the county’s general pesticide ban in a ruling that opponents of the ban called precedent setting.

McGann ruled that state law preempts the law that the County Council passed in 2015. Continue reading

Scientists find no evidence glyphosate causes cancer – The Western Producer

A panel of epidemiologists and toxicologists says the World Health Organization is wrong about glyphosate.

Continue reading

A new threat to bees? Entomopathogenic nematodes used in biological pest control cause rapid mortality in Bombus terrestris [PeerJ]

Dow predicts EPA review of herbicide safety resolved soon | Reuters

Dow Chemical Co expects environmental safety concerns about its new herbicide Enlist Duo to be resolved, the company said Wednesday, after the government asked a federal appellate court to pull regulatory approvals while the chemical’s safety is re-examined.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) approved Enlist Duo for sale and use in several U.S. states over a year ago. But the agency has since found its assessment of the product’s two active ingredients was incomplete, according to EPA’s court documents, filed late Tuesday with the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit in California.

Enlist Duo is a new combination herbicide aimed at combating weeds that have become resistant to glyphosate — a widely-used herbicide in the United States and the active ingredient of Monsanto Co’s Roundup product.

Enlist Duo combines glyphosate with another herbicide, 2,4-D, and is meant for use on corn and soybeans that have been genetically altered to tolerate it.

The EPA wants to study the product further after it found that the company’s Dow AgroSciences unit claimed the two active ingredients work better together, according to court documents. EPA said its study assumed the components did not have such “synergistic effects.”

Continue reading