SUE THEIR BRAINS OUT !

Other Methods Tried Unsuccessfully – Alternative Pesticide Ban Failure

By MARTHA WICKETT – Sic [Salmon Arms BC – Hometown to Warren Bell]
December 7, 2016 ·

If you would like to weigh in on the city’s plan to give a one-time application of pesticides to the weeds that are breaking up hard surfaces like sidewalks and curbs, you might get a chance.

Coun. Tim Lavery gave notice at the Nov. 28 council meeting that he will be making a motion at the next meeting suggesting council receive further input on its pesticide spraying program.

“I do feel it’s an important topic, and I don’t feel the budget process was the time to have the discussion,” he said, suggesting that it include a chance for an “input session from interested people.”

During budget deliberations staff said the city would be using an exemption in the cosmetic pesticides bylaw in 2017 which allows pesticides when other methods have been tried unsuccessfully. City staff reported a one-time $10,000 application of pesticides will likely be used on the islands in the Trans-Canada Highway and on sidewalks downtown, moving farther afield as funding permits.

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Former Hudson Quebec director general sentence to 30 months in jail

Feb22, 2016

The town of Hudson’s former director general Louise Léger-Villandré was sentenced to 30 months in prison during a Quebec Court hearing Monday morning in Valleyfield.

In December, Léger-Villandré, now 66, pleaded guilty to six of 19 criminal charges she faced, including charges involving more than $1 million that went missing from town hall coffers between 1996 and 2013.

She appeared before Judge Michel Mercier Monday morning for about 20 minutes. A red suitcase with her belongings was brought into the courtroom moments before she was whisked away to begin serving her sentence.

Léger-Villandré, who appeared calm and collected as she waited for her sentencing to be formalized, didn’t make a statement before the judge.

Crown prosecutor Mathieu Longpré and defence lawyer Robert La Haye had agreed to recommend a 30-month sentence.

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Richmond learns there are trade-offs to banning pesticides

Mar 17,2016

Richmond has learned there are trade-offs to banning all pesticide-use in weed abatement activities on city properties.

One year after Richmond City Council installed the ban, sparing the community from exposure to the widely-used herbicide glyphosate, city groundskeepers say they are struggling to keep up with ever-sprouting weeds in public spaces.

Public Works Director Yader presented images at Tuesday’s council meeting of  overgrown public right-of-ways no longer controlled by pesticides. The city is also having a difficult time tending to youth sports fields ahead of the summer season, Yader said, adding that at least four additional groundskeepers are needed to make up for what the use of pesticides can accomplish.

And while the groundskeepers don’t have to breathe in potentially cancer-causing chemicals, Yader added, they suffer from back problems from pulling weeds and have to spend more time working amid dangerous traffic.

Despite the hardships, the majority on City Council did not appear intent on reinstating pesticide use. They cite emerging research on glyphosate, such as a finding last year by the World Health Organization (WHO) that the chemical is “probably carcinogenic to humans.”  The finding was vehemently disputed by industry leaders. The issue on whether glyphosate causes cancer is currently being debated in Europe, where the European Union must decide whether to continue to extend the approval of its use.

Councilmember Nat Bates believes the city should bring pesticides back, saying the city is beginning to look shabby, which creates a lower quality of life for residents. He added that he doesn’t believe Richmond, which is trying to close an $8 million budget deficit, can afford to pioneer the issue. Richmond is one of only a few jurisdictions in California to have implemented a ban, according to city staff.

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European Parliament | GLYPHOSATE – YES or NO? | Dr. Pavel Poc | Mar 2, 2016

Extreme Activist Group “Avaaz” opens European Parliament Discussion 

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Question to Andrew Leu – IFOAM ORGANICS & Pavel Poc (Funder ,Organizer of Event)

From Professor David Zurak (Risk Monger):

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The problem of forming agricultural polices on Internet trends

Industry and government must adjust to new findings, but policies should not 
be based on the latest Internet trend

By Cam Dahl
Published: January 25, 2016

What does “science based” mean? For both government policy and industry best practice, science based should mean that practices are based on rigorous scientific studies. Policies and regulations that veer off the science-based path put at risk the tools that make modern agriculture possible. So do production practices that do not rigorously follow scientifically developed guidelines.

But scientific review can sometimes be messy. Scientific consensus can shift and the “right” answer can change over time as new information becomes available. New research can disprove past points of view that were once thought to be valid.

What does this mean for policy-makers and the development of industry best management practices? Practically, this means that both industry and government must be willing to adjust practices and policies when new evidence comes to light.

New evidence
For example, frequent summerfallow was once the common practice on the North American prairies. This practice has adjusted as new research and agriculture tools became available. The willingness of farmers to adapt has benefited the environment and improved economic returns.

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