– Ontario

Other Methods Tried Unsuccessfully – Alternative Pesticide Ban Failure

By MARTHA WICKETT – Sic [Salmon Arms BC – Hometown to Warren Bell]
December 7, 2016 ·

If you would like to weigh in on the city’s plan to give a one-time application of pesticides to the weeds that are breaking up hard surfaces like sidewalks and curbs, you might get a chance.

Coun. Tim Lavery gave notice at the Nov. 28 council meeting that he will be making a motion at the next meeting suggesting council receive further input on its pesticide spraying program.

“I do feel it’s an important topic, and I don’t feel the budget process was the time to have the discussion,” he said, suggesting that it include a chance for an “input session from interested people.”

During budget deliberations staff said the city would be using an exemption in the cosmetic pesticides bylaw in 2017 which allows pesticides when other methods have been tried unsuccessfully. City staff reported a one-time $10,000 application of pesticides will likely be used on the islands in the Trans-Canada Highway and on sidewalks downtown, moving farther afield as funding permits.

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Glyphosate Issue Paper:   Evaluation of Carcinogenic Potential | EPA’s Office of Pesticide Programs September 12, 2016

ROUNDUP is Safe!

 

Pesticide Vendor Rant | Cosmetic Pesticide Ban Ontario

Well I’ve been working a lot at this time of year and I started this site up to blow off some steam but over the last 2 weeks I haven’t been able to write a post or review a few beers. I have now been put back to a sane work pace of less than 60 hours a week and I will be posting a bunch on Wednesday.

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The problem of forming agricultural polices on Internet trends

Industry and government must adjust to new findings, but policies should not 
be based on the latest Internet trend

By Cam Dahl
Published: January 25, 2016

What does “science based” mean? For both government policy and industry best practice, science based should mean that practices are based on rigorous scientific studies. Policies and regulations that veer off the science-based path put at risk the tools that make modern agriculture possible. So do production practices that do not rigorously follow scientifically developed guidelines.

But scientific review can sometimes be messy. Scientific consensus can shift and the “right” answer can change over time as new information becomes available. New research can disprove past points of view that were once thought to be valid.

What does this mean for policy-makers and the development of industry best management practices? Practically, this means that both industry and government must be willing to adjust practices and policies when new evidence comes to light.

New evidence
For example, frequent summerfallow was once the common practice on the North American prairies. This practice has adjusted as new research and agriculture tools became available. The willingness of farmers to adapt has benefited the environment and improved economic returns.

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Share Your Feedback |Pollinator Health | Ontario.ca

Pollinator Health

Learn about the importance of protecting bees and other pollinators, and the actions you can take to help.

Pollinator Health Action Plan survey

Share your thoughts and recommendations on our Pollinator Health Action Plan and help us improve pollinator health in the province.

Your feedback will be considered by the Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs when we report back to the public with a final Action Plan in spring/summer 2016.

Approximate completion time: 15 minutes

Close date: March 7, 2016

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